55 Music Concourse Dr.
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco CA
94118
415.379.8000
Regular Hours:

Daily

9:30 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday

11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Members' Hours:

Tuesday

8:30 – 9:30 am

Sunday

10:00 – 11:00 am
Closures
Notices

The Academy will be closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

There are no notifications at this time.

 
Lectures and Workshops

The Academy is committed to engaging, inspiring, and empowering the public with its scientific mission. Its events and lecture programs offer thought provoking discussions on topics such as astronomy, ecology, sustainability, natural history, biodiversity, evolution and the science of life.

Conservation Photography Class
Fundamentals of Exposure

Gary Sharlow, Photographer, Education Manager

Sunday, August 24th at 1:00pm

*** Please note the new date ***

In this three-hour classroom presentation, you will learn about the inner workings of your DSLR camera. This class is designed as an overview to help you better understand your camera, the digital workflow and how to make better images. We cover basic features of the DSLR camera to include choosing lenses and filters, ISO, white balance, shutter, aperture and program modes, EV, exposure, bracketing, focusing, resolution, histograms and more. The main objective is to help you understand the fundamentals of exposure so that you can get your camera out of auto mode and start making images the way you want them to look. Once you have the skills to get the correct exposure under any conditions, we can shift our efforts to proper techniques for focus, light metering, depth of field and some basic rules of composition.

Please Note: Entrance is via the Academy's Staff and Research Entrance at the back door located at 75 Nancy Pelosi Drive. You will not be permitted entry at the front door. Please arrive at least 10 minutes early.

Reservations: Members: $40, General $50. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Pritzker Lecture
Metal Munching Plants

Dylan Burge, Assistant Curator and Howell Chair of Western North American Botany

Wednesday September 3rd at 7:30pm
Did you know that some plants like to eat metal? Over 1,000 species of plants are known to gobble up and store heavy metals, including a host of toxic elements such as nickel, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and selenium. There are even some plants that store gold. Some of these plants store enough metals to make them toxic to animals like cattle, and a few of them are even mined for the metals they contain. The Academy’s newest botany curator Dylan Burge will take you on a tour of the world's metal-munching plants, and explain how his research is helping to unravel how metal-storing plants evolved, and why they engage in this strange and way cool behavior. Dylan is an assistant curator in the Department of Botany at the California Academy of Sciences. He grew up in California, where he developed a love for living things. He attended UC Davis, and obtained a B.S. in Evolution and Ecology in 2004 before then completing his graduate work at Duke University, obtaining a Ph.D. in Biology in 2011. He has conducted post-doctoral work in Australia and Canada, and field work around the world, including Africa, Madagascar, Central America, and Mexico.

Reservations: Members: Free, General $12, Seniors $10. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture
A Deep View on the Early Universe:
Extreme Makeovers and Overweight Galaxies

Mariska Kriek,
Assistant Professor of Astronomy, UC Berkeley

Monday, September 8 at 7:30pm, Planetarium
Galaxies are the building blocks of the Universe; massive structures that contain up to 1000s of billions of stars. Galaxies in today's Universe show a striking diversity among their properties, with large variations in their appearance, age, size, weight, and stellar birth rate. Despite this diversity, galaxies can broadly be divided into two types: low-mass spiral galaxies with high stellar production rates, and massive old elliptical galaxies in which no new stars are being formed. Whereas this broad distinction was already recognized by Edwin Hubble in the 1920s, it has remained a puzzle as to how this dichotomy originated. In particular, the elliptical galaxy population poses great challenges, as we do not understand why these galaxies form no stars in a Universe with plenty of fuel. In order to explain their enormous number of stars, we know that their stellar birth rates must have been high in the past, after which some process halted the formation of new stars. Fortunately, the finite speed of light offers us a direct view of the distant pasts of galaxies. Galaxies have been observed over most of the history of the Universe, as early as 0.5 billion years after the Big Bang. In this talk, Kriek will present recent studies of galaxies in the Early Universe, and discuss our current view of how different types of galaxies may have formed and evolved over cosmic time.

Reservations: Members: $8, General $12, Seniors $10. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Special Program
In the Human Age

Diane Ackerman, Best Selling Author

Wed Sept 17th at 7pm in Tusher African Hall
Poet, essayist, and naturalist, Diane Ackerman is the author of two dozen highly acclaimed works of nonfiction and poetry, including The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses ― books beloved by millions of readers all over the world. In prose so rich and evocative that one can feel the earth turning beneath one’s feet as one reads, Ackerman’s thrilling observations urge us to live in the moment, to wake up to nature’s everyday miracles. Diane Ackerman's forthcoming nonfiction book The Human Age: the world shaped by us, celebrates the natural world and human ingenuity, while exploring how the human race has become the single dominant force of change on the whole planet, and the many earth-shaking changes that now affect every part of our lives and those of our fellow creatures. The Human Age is a beguiling, optimistic engagement with the earth-shaking changes now affecting every part of our lives and those of our fellow creatures — a wise book that will astound, delight, and inform intelligent life for a long time to come. “Our relationship with nature has changed radically, irreversibly, but by no means all for the bad. Our new epoch is laced with invention. Our mistakes are legion, but our talent is immeasurable.” — The Human Age, Diane Ackerman

Reservations: Members: $10, General $12. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Conservation Photography Class
Next Steps: Beyond The Auto Mode of your DSLR

Gary Sharlow, Photographer, Education Manager

Sunday, September 21 at 1:00pm
Go beyond the auto mode of your DSLR. We will explore the fundamentals necessary to understand when to use shutter or aperture priority and even give you the tools to start exploring full control of your photographic techniques in the manual mode of your DSLR. We will explore the way the aperture, shutter and ISO settings interact to control light and give you the exposure you desire. We will also look at how these three elements effect the depth of field, motion blur and grain effects in your images. Conservation photography is a vision of photography that has a long history with a new purpose. Typically, pressing the shutter defines the photographer with planning and execution culminating in the photograph. A conservation photographer’s work begins once they click the shutter. It’s what you do with these images that matters as it takes you into the active roll of effecting conservation for the natural world.

Please Note: Entrance is via the Academy's Staff and Research Entrance at the back door located at 75 Nancy Pelosi Drive. Please arrive at least 10 minutes early.

Reservations: Members: $40, General $50. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Pritzker Lecture: The Remedy
Thomas Goetz, Science Writer

Wednesday, September 24 at 7:00pm, African Hall
The riveting history of tuberculosis, the world’s most lethal disease, the two men whose lives it tragically intertwined, and the birth of medical science. In 1875, tuberculosis was the deadliest disease in the world, accountable for a third of all deaths. A diagnosis of TB—often called consumption—was a death sentence. Then, in a triumph of medical science, a German doctor named Robert Koch deployed an unprecedented scientific rigor to discover the bacteria that caused TB. Koch soon embarked on a remedy—a remedy that would be his undoing. Capturing the moment when mystery and magic began to yield to science, The Remedy chronicles the stunning story of how the germ theory of disease became a true fact, how two men of ambition were emboldened to reach for something more, and how scientific discoveries evolve into social truths.

Reservations: Members: Free, General $12, Seniors $10. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Brilliant!Science: Pandemic
Extreme Medicine

Matt Lewin MD, Academy Fellow
Director of the Center for Exploration & Travel Health

Mon, Sept. 29 at 8:00 pm | The New Parkway, Oakland
Held monthly in more than 70 cities around the globe, Nerd Nite is where science nerds take the stage to deliver fun and informative presentations, while audience-nerds drink along. Throughout his career, Dr. Matt Lewin has treated patients and scientists in some of the world’s most remote locations and under the harshest conditions. Lewin, along with an international group of colleagues, made headlines recently for their pioneering approach to the treatment of venomous snakebites using a nasal spray. This novel technique is the first step toward finding a universal antidote for snakebite—one of the world’s most neglected tropical diseases, affecting nearly 5 million people annually. Snakes kill and maim more than 25 times as many people as land mines and rank 3rd on the Earth's "Most deadly animals" list after mosquitos and humans. Anti-venom has been around for more than 125 years and remains the state-of-the-art treatment. Yet, it has not proven to be a medically or economically effective solution to this issue. Dr. Lewin discusses the history of snakebite research and potential solutions to this woefully neglected global problem. Hear Lewin’s exciting tales from the field during this special edition of Nerd Nite.

Reservations: $8, all ages. Nerd Nite East Bay is held at The New Parkway, 474 24th St., Oakland. For tickets, please visit: Nerd Nite Doors open at 7:00 pm.


 

Conservation Photography Class & Excursion
Whales, Birds & Life of the Farallon Islands

Gary Sharlow, Photographer, Education Manager

Sat Oct 4th 1pm - 4pm at the Academy
Sun Oct 5 Boat Excursion 8am - 4pm out of Sausalito
Affectionately known as San Francisco’s "Galapagos Islands" the Farallon Islands serve as one of the most biologically rich and important habitats along the western coast of the United States. Come do what 99% of San Francisco residents never do… hop aboard a boat and ride out under the Golden Gate Bridge to visit one of the richest marine ecosystems in the world. The Farallon Islands, just 27 miles off the coast of San Francisco, lie amid the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, a food-rich marine ecosystem that attracts whales, dolphins, seals and seabirds each summer and fall, to feed and to breed. Researchers have catalogued hundreds of individual humpbacks and blue whales as seasonal feeding residents. Twenty three species of marine mammals, including eighteen species of whales and dolphins, can be found here. The Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge is the largest seabird rookery in the contiguous United States with nesting Tufted Puffins, Pigeon Guillemots, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres and other species. Migratory seabirds such as Shearwaters, Jaegers, and Phalaropes are also attracted by these nutrient-rich waters. Island beaches are covered with sea lions, including massive Steller's sea lions, now on the Endangered Species List.

Isidore (Izzy) Szczepaniak is a field investigator for the Oceanic Society/Cascadia Research humpback whale research program in California and Costa Rica. Since 1972, primarily as a Research Associate for the California Academy of Sciences' Department of Mammalogy, Izzy has studied and published papers on marine mammals. In Australia and New Zealand he assisted with research on dusky dolphins and sperm whales. Other cetacean research includes work for Cascadia Research in northern California, and harbor porpoise surveys off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington for the National Marine Fisheries Service. He is a member of the Marine Mammal Stranding Network. Szczepaniak will discuss the research he conducts on the marine life that make the Farallon Islands home… or at least a stop over in their annual migrations. Gary Sharlow will give an introduction to your DSLR that will provide you with some easy tips that will allow you to keep your head up with your eyes on the horizon and in search of whales and birds. (The advice is also intended to help you keep from looking down at your camera during the trip so you can be enjoying the life of the Farallon Islands and not think about your camera.)

Please Note: Entrance is via the Academy's Staff and Research Entrance at the back door located at 75 Nancy Pelosi Drive. Please arrive at least 10 minutes early.

Reservations: Members $150 Non-Members $175 (Ages 14-17 with Guardian or 18+) 3 Hours on Saturday and 8 hours Boat trip on Sunday. Tickets must be purchase at least 2 weeks in advance of the event. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831. Ticket includes all day admission to the Academy on Saturday.


 

Benjamin Dean Lecture
A Planet for Goldilocks

Natalie Batalha, Space Sciences Division of NASA Ames

Monday October 6th at 7:30pm Morrison Planetarium
Not too hot, not too cold reads the prescription for a world that's just right for life as we know it. Finding evidence of life beyond Earth is one of the primary goals of astronomy focused science agencies in the United States and abroad. The goal looms closer as a result of recent discoveries made by NASA's Kepler Mission. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems orbiting other stars in the galaxy. Finding inhabited environments is a path of exploration that stretches decades into the future and begins by determining if Goldilocks planets abound. Dr. Batalha will describe the latest discoveries of NASA's Kepler Mission and the possibilities for finding inhabited environments in the not-so-distant future.

Reservations: Members: $8, General $12, Seniors $10. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Exclusive Member Special
Introduction to Nature Photography for Youth

Kathryn Whitney, Photographer, Academy Photo Editor

Sunday October 12th 1pm- 4pm in the Boardroom
Young photographers ages 15 to 18 will explore the basics of nature photography with Academy photo editor and photographer Kathryn Whitney. In this hands-on workshop, our students will be acquainted with the power of a DSLR camera! We’ll cover a wide range of topics to include the fundamentals for shooting in shutter, aperture or manual modes explaining briefly which mode is right for a given situation. From there we will jump into the basic principles of composition to help the photographer see more creatively when they work the shot. Have you ever struggled with a tricky lighting situation? Learn how to get the most out of the situation with some simple tricks of the trade. Instructors will also address the benefits of shooting in RAW, the importance of white balance and color temperature, as well as proper focusing technique. Afterwards, we will head out on the Academy floor to test our skills in the aquarium, rainforest, and on the Living Roof. Time permitting, the workshop will conclude with a brief image review and group critique so the photographers can benefit from direct feedback on their work.

BorrowLenses.com will provide the attendees with Canon EOS Rebel cameras to use for this workshop. You may bring your own camera if you have one that you prefer to use during the workshop. Entrance is via the Academy's Staff and Research Entrance at the back door located at 75 Nancy Pelosi Drive. Please arrive at least 10 minutes early.

Reservations: Members Aged 15-18: $35. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Photography Presentation
Earth As My Witness

Art Wolfe, Award Winning Nature Photographer

Mon Oct 20 2014 at 7:30 pm in Morrison Planetarium
For almost fifty years, world-renowned photographer Art Wolfe has been capturing the beauty of the planet's stunning landscapes, wildlife, and cultures from every continent. In Earth Is My Witness, Wolfe presents an encyclopedic selection of his photography along with intimate stories about his encounters that exemplify his boundless curiosity about the world. From the rich sights and smells of the Pushkar Camel Fair to the moment when a polar bear and her cubs leave their arctic den, these images represent what Wolfe has lived for: the instants when circumstance, light, and subject miraculously collide to form an iconic photograph. Together, these images and the stories behind them explore the delicate interconnectivity of life across our planet. In this presentation we will immerse the viewer inside a sequence of Wolfe's images presented on the Morrison Planetarium's 75 foot all digital dome. You will experience a tour through the world's great landscapes, wildlife and cultural festivities to get a sense of what it's like to be Art Wolfe as he travels the globe making images of captivating moments in time. Book signing to follow.

Reservations: Members: $10, General $12. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Conservation Photography Class
Introduction to Your DSLR

Gary Sharlow ,
Photographer, Education Manager

Sunday October 26th 1pm to 4pm in the Boardroom
In this three-hour classroom presentation, you will learn about the inner workings of your DSLR camera. This class is designed as an overview to help you better understand your camera, the digital workflow and how to make better images. We cover basic features of the DSLR camera to include choosing lenses and filters, ISO, white balance, shutter, aperture and program modes, EV, exposure, bracketing, focusing, resolution, histograms and more. The main objective is to help you understand the fundamentals of exposure so that you can get your camera out of auto mode and start making images the way you want them to look. Once you have the skills to get the correct exposure under any conditions, we can shift our efforts to proper techniques for focus, light metering, depth of field and some basic rules of composition.

Please Note: Entrance is via the Academy's Staff and Research Entrance at the back door located at 75 Nancy Pelosi Drive. You will not be permitted entry at the front door. Please arrive at least 10 minutes early.

Reservations: Members: $40, General $50. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Conservation Photography Overnight Excursion
In The Spotlight: Lassen National Park

Gary Sharlow, Photographer, Education Manager

Saturday & Sunday June 13, 14 2015 from 8am to 8pm
Lassen Volcanic National Park is home to smoking fumaroles, meadows freckled with wildflowers, clear mountain lakes, and numerous volcanoes. Jagged peaks tell the story of its eruptive past while hot water continues to mold the land. Lassen Volcanic offers opportunities to discover the wonder and mysteries of volcanoes and hot water for visitors willing to explore the undiscovered. The remarkable hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park include roaring fumaroles (steam and volcanic-gas vents), thumping mud pots, boiling pools, and steaming ground. Water from rain and snow that falls on the highlands of the park feed the hydrothermal system. Once deep underground, the water is heated by a body of hot or molten rock beneath Lassen Peak. Rising hot water boils to form boiling pools and mud pots. Super-heated steam reaches the surface through fractures in the earth to form fumaroles such as those found at Bumpass Hell and Sulphur Works. In this two day excursion you will be joined by a professional photographer who will guide you to some the most photographic spots on the mountain while also helping you learn the inner workings of your camera and offering tips on how to create stunning nature images. This trip will be kept to a small group and you will be driven to the trail heads by your guide. Leave your car at the lodging grounds and kick back for a full day of guided adventure.

Your instructor will be lodging at Hat Creek Resort. You are welcome to book cabins, tent sites or bring your own RV. You will be contacted by your guide before the trip so that you know how to meet up and where to board the van on Saturday and Sunday mornings at 8am. At the end of the day on Sunday, you will be brought back to the meeting location.

Reservations: Members: $200, General $225. Space is limited and advanced ticketing is required.  (Ages 18+ must be able to hike 5-10 miles each day at a class 5 strenuous level.) Please buy your tickets in advance to avoid a trip cancellation. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831

 

Conversations On Science

For this series, the Academy has partnered with City Arts & Lectures, Inc. to present distinguished scientists, professors, writers, thinkers, photographers and artists who discuss important and timely scientific and environmental issues. These conversations are held downtown at San Francisco's beautiful Nourse Theatre at 275 Hayes Street at Franklin Street.


Reservations:
Call 415-392-4400 or visit: City Box Office (Academy discounts applied during checkout.)

Members: $25 Orchestra
Non Members: $27 Orchestra


 

The Neuroscience of Music & Creativity
Indre Viskontas in Conversation with Kelly McGonigal

Wednesday, May 21 2014 7:30pm at the Nourse Theatre
A cognitive neuroscientist with UCSF and member of the faculty at the San Franciso Conservatory of Music, Indre Viskontas studies how memories, creativity and other cognitive processes are supported by neural networks  using the latest techniques  including direct recordings from neurons in the human brain and high-resolution functional MRIs. She has published ground-breaking work on the neural basis of memory and creativity and has won numerous research and teaching awards. Viskontas is a classically trained soprano and performs with regional opera companies and chamber music groups in the Bay Area and is the co-founder of Vocallective, a consortium of singers and instrumentalists dedicated to the art of vocal chamber music.

Indre Viskontas will be in conversation with Kelly McGonigal a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University. She teaches for the School of Medicine's Health Improvement Program and is a senior teacher/consultant for the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education. Her work demonstrates the applications from psychology, neuroscience, and medicine to personal health and happiness, as well as organizational success and social change. She is the author of the popular books: The Neuroscience of Change, The Willpower Instinct, and Yoga for Pain Relief.

Ticketing Information


 

Science & Scripture: Inside the Vatican Observatory
Father George Coyne, SJ in Conversation with Ryan Wyatt

Monday, June 9 2014 7:30pm at the Nourse Theatre
As a priest and an astronomer, Fr. Coyne bridges the worlds of faith and science. He has also been active in the continuing debate about the religious implications of scientific evolution. George V. Coyne, SJ is Director Emeritus of the Vatican Observatory and currently holds the McDevitt Chair in Religious Philosophy at Le Moyne College where he is teaching astronomy and developing a lecture series regarding the science and religion dialogue. He is an observational astronomer of international stature and has been widely recognized for promoting the dialogue between science and religion. He pioneered the series of conferences on “Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action” which bring together scientists and theologians from around the world.  

Fr. Coyne will be in conversation with Ryan Wyatt, the Director of the Morrison Planetarium and Science Visualization studio at the California Academy of Sciences. Wyatt has written and directed the Academy’s three fulldome features, Fragile Planet (2008), Life: A Cosmic Story (2010), and Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet (2012) and is currently in production on the Academy’s upcoming fourth planetarium show.

Ticketing Information



 

Reservations:
Call 415-392-4400 or visit: City Box Office (Academy discounts applied during checkout.)

Members: $25 Orchestra
Non Members: $27 Orchestra


Pritzker Lectures 

Free to Academy members, the Pritzker lecture series features engaging speakers from the Bay Area and beyond. Topics cover a wide range of subjects related to the Academy's mission to "explore, explain, and sustain life."

Benjamin Dean Lectures

This series of talks for the general public is given by noted scientists in the fields of astronomy and space science. It is held in the Morrison Planetarium, home of the most accurate and interactive digital Universe ever created, which is shown on the world's largest all-digital dome.


 

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture
A Deep View on the Early Universe:
Extreme Makeovers and Overweight Galaxies

Mariska Kriek,
Assistant Professor of Astronomy, UC Berkeley

Monday, September 8 at 7:30pm, Planetarium
Galaxies are the building blocks of the Universe; massive structures that contain up to 1000s of billions of stars. Galaxies in today's Universe show a striking diversity among their properties, with large variations in their appearance, age, size, weight, and stellar birth rate. Despite this diversity, galaxies can broadly be divided into two types: low-mass spiral galaxies with high stellar production rates, and massive old elliptical galaxies in which no new stars are being formed. Whereas this broad distinction was already recognized by Edwin Hubble in the 1920s, it has remained a puzzle as to how this dichotomy originated. In particular, the elliptical galaxy population poses great challenges, as we do not understand why these galaxies form no stars in a Universe with plenty of fuel. In order to explain their enormous number of stars, we know that their stellar birth rates must have been high in the past, after which some process halted the formation of new stars. Fortunately, the finite speed of light offers us a direct view of the distant pasts of galaxies. Galaxies have been observed over most of the history of the Universe, as early as 0.5 billion years after the Big Bang. In this talk, Kriek will present recent studies of galaxies in the Early Universe, and discuss our current view of how different types of galaxies may have formed and evolved over cosmic time.

Reservations: Members: $8, General $12, Seniors $10. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831


 

Benjamin Dean Lecture
A Planet for Goldilocks

Natalie Batalha, Space Sciences Division of NASA Ames

Monday October 6th at 7:30pm Morrison Planetarium
Not too hot, not too cold reads the prescription for a world that's just right for life as we know it. Finding evidence of life beyond Earth is one of the primary goals of astronomy focused science agencies in the United States and abroad. The goal looms closer as a result of recent discoveries made by NASA's Kepler Mission. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems orbiting other stars in the galaxy. Finding inhabited environments is a path of exploration that stretches decades into the future and begins by determining if Goldilocks planets abound. Dr. Batalha will describe the latest discoveries of NASA's Kepler Mission and the possibilities for finding inhabited environments in the not-so-distant future.

Reservations: Members: $8, General $12, Seniors $10. Seating is limited and advanced ticketing is required. To reserve a place today, buy a Member or Non-Member ticket online or over the phone at 1-877-227-1831

Recorded Lectures

   

            

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BigPicture Competition

   

Our first year is complete and the judges have chosen the winners! On exhibt  August 1st - November 2nd 2014

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Member Perks

   

There are numerous benefits to being an Academy member:

  • Free unlimited daily admission
  • Personalized member card
  • Members-only hours
  • Free Pritzker members' lectures
  • And Many More...

Parking Options

   

Parking is available in the Music Concourse Garage seven days a week from 7 am–7 pm.  Limited 4hr parking is available on John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Nancy Pelosi Drive until 10pm (Except on Sundays) Please note that the garage is not operated by the California Academy of Sciences. For information, call 415.750.0741 Get Directions